Posted by & filed under Articles.

Ode to the Speckled Trout by Dr. Bogus (11/98)BIPTrout_s

The Trout is a fish

You’d like on your dish

They’re as frustrating as they can be.

 

Neither plug or live bait

Nor grub or cut skate

Could reverse your fate called fish-free.

 

Even when they’re in sight

Don’t mean that they’ll bite

They’ll feast whenever they please.

 

Oh this shell game they play

“That’s trout fishin’” we say

And we love it from this year to next.

 

Now my frosted hands tingle

The thoughts of Kris Kringle

And visions of trout yet to be!!

Posted by & filed under Articles.

Grandpa Knows Trout, By Dr. Bogus, 12/25/96

trout in hand

On a warm sunny Sunday in late November, just before the Thanksgiving holiday, I was fishing a hole about one mile up from Bogue Inlet. Bogue Inlet is a beautiful region of Bogue Banks, the East‑West running barrier island at the most Southern reaches of the Outer Banks in North Carolina. It’s a nice hole, I’d say a six to seven man hole at best, no funny stuff, just an opening in the sandbar, and closed on both sides‑like a horse shoe. It had been a productive hole throughout the summer, black drum, red drum and the like, Spanish and blues, a good hole. Now along with the rest, specks, speckled trout, officially spotted sea trout, it’s fall you know, almost Thanksgiving. I’d been fishing there and up and down the beach most of the morning, plugging for trout‑MirrOlures, grubs, the usual.

Late in the morning, a family, actually two, in two 4 x 4 pickups, drive up and join me. One of the men, walks over and says “How ya doin’, I’m Mike I work over at Bogue Field”.

Bogue Field, it’s the air base a few miles away, over on the mainland. Well, we exchange pleasantries; he explained how he was here with his wife and his friend and his friend’s wife, and of course his grandpa and how they come here a lot. We then each boasted how this hole had produced drum and trout for the each of us, and so on. We then went on our ways, I plugged, they rigged, we spent the pleasantness of the afternoon fishing occasionally communicating via nonverbal gestures.

One thing you must never do when surf casting is take your eyes off of the surf, don’t get distracted, even for a moment, and never, never, never, ever turn your back on the… **CRASH** “man down” was the cry. Well Mike had done the unthinkable, turned his head or back or something, anyway he went from fishing to the fine art of swimming in waders in an instant. Sand in his reel, 50-degree water trickling its way down to the toes of the waders.

The reaction was immediate, fighting the surf and beach for control of his body, Mike finally emerged from the water unaided. In an attempt to cover his embarrassment, Mike instantaneously lashed a blue streak of profanity that should have, in a perfect world, cleared the sand from his reel and dried the cold salty water from his waders, and reestablish his rightful position in the universe. Well, it didn’t work. Mike, dripping and cursing, friends and family hiding their smiles, he retreated to the cover of the passenger side of his pickup, stripped in defeat to what of his undergarments had remained dry, not many I might add, and regarbed himself in fresh‑dry‑attire. He now rejoined the rest of us, his wife, his friends and of course grandpa, to face the music as it were.

But this story is about grandpa. Mike’s Grandpa was a man of 82 years, and been fishin’ these parts, Bogue Banks, for the better part of the twentieth century. It’s fall, and grandpa knows trout. So, he was here just like he’d been the year before, and the year before that, and so on. Grandpa was dressed for trout, with his hip hugging boots hooked at his waist, several layers of plaid flannel shirts and a cap that had fished with him for the better part of this century as well. Gramps had one maybe two rods, one sand spike, his sand chair and a pile of cut shrimp 2, 3 maybe 4-pieces per shrimp, if they were big.  He was ready for an afternoon of troutin’. Once grandpa baited his hook, he would place his rod over his right shoulder walk slowly down the beach on the outgoing wave, measuring its retreat with the precision of the Acapulco cliff divers. He proceeded to cast the shrimp and its accompanying 3-ounces of lead with the snap of his wrist, turn his back to the now incoming wave, with the earned confidence of his 82 years, place his rod back over his right shoulder he retreated back up the sandy slope cranking his reel in reverse. Once he reached his destination, he turned, and gently if not gracefully, lowered himself into his chair, placed his rod across his lap and assumed the troutin’ position.

Grandpa would, from time‑to‑time, when he choose, when it was right, slowly retrieve his line, crank‑crank, back up the sandy slope, crank‑crank, sinker in tow, crank‑crank‑crank, scratching a thin line in the sand, up to his feet. He would check the bait for damage and replace it if necessary, then carefully, if not gracefully get up, walk back to water’s edge on the outgoing wave, cast, turn and retreat to his chair just as precisely as he had done before.

This went on much of the afternoon, me and my pluggin’, Mike and the others chuckin’ lead, occasional black drum or such, when, almost unnoticed, grandpa’s rod became alive. Grandpa, just as before, started to crank‑crank, crank-crank‑crank, then again, slowly one crank then another, then another, and so on. Finally, someone, Mike’s wife I think, yelled, “gramp’s got a fish”. Well maybe a pinfish, or drum or something, but by now gramps had been crankin’ long enough that we all could see that it was a trout. Beautifully silvered, black speckles, two maybe three pounds, no match for grandpa. Somebody, maybe Mike’s wife or someone, yelled, “Get the net!” (get the net? I thought). Well, luckily gramps ignored the commotion and kept a crankin’.

With grandpa fully in control, he’d done this a thousand times before, you know, the fish now emerged from the surf, up onto the hard wet beach sand up towards his chair. When with the efficiency and dedication of a flock of hungry gulls ready to poke out the fish’s eyes, the rest of the entourage descended upon the fish, plucked it off the hook, placed the trout in the cooler in the back of the pickup and each in turn patted grandpa on the head in recognition of his triumph. Well, grandpa, without looking up, sighed oh so slightly in acknowledgment. He then rebaited his hook, walked himself back down the sandy slope measuring the retreating wave, just as precisely as he had done before. He cast his fresh piece of shrimp and 3-ounce pyramid sinker back into the hole, right along the west edge of the hole, turned, placing his rod on his shoulder, back‑cranking his reel, he returned to his chair, put his reel on his lap, looking seaward, continued troutin’. You know, Grandpa‑KNOWS‑trout!

Posted by & filed under Reports category.

Dr. Bogus’ “Ladies Galore!” mini-Fishing Report for 9/28/13. Surf 75°, sound 72°.

Every Monday Morning at 7:30 am on www.TheTalkStation.com. 107.1 FM (WTKF), 1240 AM (WJNC). If you can’t listen on the radio, you can log in to www.TheTalkStation.com and listen on-line or check out Coastal Daybreak on Facebook. The show will be linked there as an mp3 file. Now rebroadcast on each Sunday morning at 6:00am.

Now is the time to get a birthday or gift subscription for a fellow fisherman or spouse for fishing lessons (surf, pier or Bogue Sound) or the “Totally Bogus Fishing Report”. How about a Dr. Bogus hat? Gift Certificates are available. Don’t spend another year in the fish market, make this YOUR season to catch the big ones, just like me

SPONSORs OF THE WEEK: These are VIP sponsors of Dr. Bogus and www.ncoif.com so please support them this season, Crystal Coast Adventures, Cape Custom Rods, Coastal Marine & Sports, Reel Outdoors Bait & Tackle and Village Market, Emerald Isle Realty, Cape Crusader Charters. Check the Sponsor’s section of www.ncoif.com for details and contact information, and please tell ‘em Dr. Bogus sent you!

Capt. Dean Lamont (www.crystalcoastadventures.com): Fall fishing is right around the corner. Dean is booking false albacore trips for October and November. Best fishing is usually between Oct. 15th and Nov. 15th. Some of the best days are still available. Trout fishing is always available plus excellent bottom fishing. Check out Capt. Dean out this fall.

Fall arrived on Sunday with heavy rain, winds and a strong cold front…perfect. Fishing is showing some signs of fall revival with bait in the water and water temperatures now sinking back into the 70s, a real sign of fall. A plethora of pompano showed at Bogue Pier over the weekend a usual early fall visitor. With the pier crowded shoulder to shoulder and the pompano’s survival approach being swimming parallel to the pier, tangled lines were almost as abundant as the pompano. There were also plenty of sea mullet in the mix too. Ditto for the surf with sea mullet, some over two-pounds, and pompano being landed on sand fleas and FishBites baits and shrimp. So how about the spots? There are some showing to the north of us, some on Topsail Island and a few in our local waters as well, particularly in the Beaufort area.  I know that they are around, since they are showing up in the local restaurants as well.

BIPTrout_sSo where did I catch that 20-inch speckled trout? Any spots yet? What about Old Drum fishing in the Neuse, what artificials work? Flies? Pompano? SO where are they and how big are they? Wahoo are still hot, but what’s the key water temp and where are they? Need an update on Bogue Banks or Topsail piers? I got it! On Wednesday I surf fished from one end of Bogue Banks to the other, what did I see? What piers had a good, no great week with big kings? Any false albacore around? One fishing pier is being extended another under construction, but where are they? For this and much more, you can subscribe to the full “Totally Bogus Fishing Report” for less than 7-cents/day, still only $25/year. It’s getting close to summer fishing season, so there’s no reason for YOU to miss out! Just send a check for $25 and your e-mail address to:

Dr. Bogus

P.O. Box 5225

Emerald Isle, NC 28594

The Ask Dr. Bogus Fishing show, heard every Monday morning at 7:30 on WTKF, 107.1 FM and 1240 AM can now be accessed on the Coastal Daybreak Facebook page. Sign up and be a friend at: https://www.facebook.com/coastal.daybreak and never miss a show. And now WTKF daily programming, including the Ask Dr. Bogus radio show is available in live streaming audio too. Just go to www.thetalkstation.com and click on the arrow. Just click to listen, it’s just that easy!

Bogus Notes: 1) Check me out at www.Facebook.com/Dr.Bogus. 2) Log onto my web site at www.ncoif.com. 3) “Ask Dr. Bogus” is on the radio every Monday 7:30 AM, WTKF 107.1 FM 1240 AM. Call in and Ask Dr. Bogus, 800.818.2255. 3) I’m located at 118 Conch Ct. in “Sea Dunes”, just off Coast Guard Rd., Emerald Isle, NC 28594. Mailing address is P.O. Box 5225, Emerald Isle, NC 28594. Don’t forget a gift certificate for your favorite angler for fishing lessons or my totally Bogus Fishing Report subscription. Please stop by at anytime and say “Hi” (252.354.4905).

Posted by & filed under Fishing, Fishing News.

Waters reopen to flounder gill nets

MOREHEAD CITY – Waters south of Oregon Inlet will reopen to set flounder gill nets Sept. 30.

N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries Director Louis Daniel issued proclamations yesterday that will reopen parts of Pamlico Sound, upper Core Sound and estuarine waters south of the N.C. 58 bridge that have been closed since July.

These waters will reopen under provisions of a newly-received sea turtle incidental take permit for gill nets, which carries the same restrictions on soak times and gear requirements and requirement for observer coverage as was previously implemented through a lawsuit settlement agreement between the state and the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center.

The permit divides the estuarine waters of the state into seven different areas and authorizes an annual, per-species limit of incidental sea turtle takes in each area. These allowed takes are divided into two fishing gears: large-mesh and small-mesh gill nets.

While exempted from regulations in the lawsuit settlement agreement, there are observer coverage requirements and limits on sea turtle takes for the small-mesh gill net fishery in the incidental take permit.

In addition, the Pamlico Sound Gill Net Restricted Area now falls under the same soak times, gear requirements and observer requirements as other areas. A federal, seasonal deepwater large-mesh gill net closure in Pamlico Sound remains in place.

Under the permit, the fishing year begins Sept. 1 and ends Aug. 31, so if the level of allowed incidental takes is met by either gear for any sea turtle species in a particular water area, it will close that water area to the specific gill net gear until Aug. 31, 2014.

Another new requirement is that all commercial and recreational gill net fishermen must report any incidental capture of a sea turtle to the division at 252-726-7021 or 1-800-682-2632. This includes both large-mesh and small-mesh gill nets.

For specific regulations, see Proclamations M-30-2013 and M-31-2013 at http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/proclamations.

For more information, contact Chris Batsavage, the division’s Protected Resources Section chief, at 252-808-8009 or Chris.Batsavage@ncdenr.gov.

Posted by & filed under Fishing, Fishing News.

PROCLAMATION: M-29-2013

RE:  GILL NET AND SEINE RESTRICTIONS: DEER AND SCHOOLHOUSE (ROCKY RUN) CREEKS IN CAPE CARTERET
Dr. Louis B. Daniel III, Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 8:30 P.M.  Tuesday, October 1, 2013, the following provisions shall apply to the use of gill nets and seines:

I.  AREA DESCRIPTION-CARTERET COUNTY
Deer and Schoolhouse (Rocky Run) Creeks – All waters upstream of a line beginning at a point on the west shore 34° 41.0449’N – 77° 03.3250’W; running northeasterly to a point on the east shore 34° 41.1826’N – 77° 03.1071’W. (See Map)

II.  GEAR RESTRICTIONS
The following restrictions apply to the use of gill nets and seines in the area described in I. above from October 1 through March 31:
A.     It is unlawful to use gill nets or seines from 8:30 P.M. to sunrise.
B.     It is unlawful to use a gill net or seine more than 200 yards in length.
C.     Gill nets and seines must have reflective markers spaced every 50 yards along the top or cork line of the net.
D.     Nets shall be attended at all times to facilitate movement of the nets so as not to obstruct navigation.

III.  GENERAL INFORMATION
A.     This proclamation is issued under the authority of N.C.G. S. 113-134; 113-170.4; 113-170.5; 113-182; 113-221.1; 143B-289.52 and N.C. Fisheries Commission Rules 15A NCAC 03H .0103 and 03J .0103 and 03J .0301 (j).
B.     It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Fisheries Director under his delegated authority pursuant to N.C. Fisheries Commission Rule 15A NCAC 03H .0103.
C.     The intent of this proclamation is to attempt to reduce conflict between residents and fishermen in these particular creeks. It applies to all gill nets and seines.
D.     The restrictions in this proclamation apply to gill nets and seines used by Recreational Commercial Gear License holders as well as Standard and Retired Standard Commercial Fishing License holders.

September 20, 2013, 9:30 A.M., M-29-2013

Posted by & filed under Articles.

How To: Drivin’ the Beach (inspired by actual events). By Dr. Bogus

1 are drum in_sIf you are a staunch surf fisherman like myself, access to the good spots, jetties, inlets, bars, sloughs and the like, and mobility to get from one to the other, are high on the list for a successful catching, not just fishing trip, to the beach. Here are some totally BOGUS tips to help the sand-bound fisherman return home with both their vehicle and pride intact.

Things to know BEFORE you go:

First there is the checklist of things to keep on board, and you better check it twice: tire pressure gauge, tide table, tow chain, rope or strap, a thick wooden board and shovel and repeat after me “NO beach toys”. And, do you have a cell phone?? Is the battery charged?

I know it seems basic, but please make sure you are in 4 x 4 mode, BEFORE you go over the ramp onto the beach! People forget all the time and you can easily tell the forgetful when their vehicle has just gotten onto the beach, just over the ramp, where some of the softest sand usually is, and already has one set of wheels planted squarely in the quicksand. That baffled look on the face of the driver is also a dead give-a-way. It’s so easy, just remember get into four-wheel mode BEFORE you go. By the way, have you ever forgotten to put the plug in your boat, and wondered why you were sinking as you left the dock? No, of course not, not me either!

Again, BEFORE you proceed over the entrance ramp, lower your tire pressure to around 20-psig (15-25) and remember to repressurize after leaving the beach. It’s a safety thing. These days there are inexpensive tire deflators that automatically deflate to a set tire pressure, Tire Buddies, Oasis Trailhead Tire Deflators are some of them. Lowering the tire pressure increases the area of the tire that is in contact with the sand and will allow the vehicle to ride on top of the sand, where you want to be, rather than sinking in up to your hubcaps.

3 with tow vehicle too_sOne of the things that I have on the checklist was a tide table. If possible, plan you tides, low/outgoing tide is best. Know thy tide, plan ahead and move up on the incoming tide before you and your 4 x 4 gets soggy and salty.

 

 

 

 

Going:

Start straight, start slow when you go, or you’ll pay the tow. Never gun the engine on a start, let out clutch slowly if you are driving a manual transmission, and don’t throw sand. Keep wheels straight ahead when starting up. Drive in the tracks left by the vehicles before you if possible. The sand is already packed down in these areas and you have a much better chance of not getting stuck. Another choice, depending on the tide and beach conditions, drive on damp hard packed sand and remember air is your enemy; it’s what makes sand soft. Driving at low tide and rain soaked sand are the best; avoid soft and deep soft and fluffy ruts (hahaha).

When you are on the beach, you often have to turn around or make other “moving” maneuvers, so plan your turns don’t cut them sharp, be gentle and plot your spot. Turns should be made going down hill, from soft sand to hard, it’s a killer to turn from the low hard sand near the water, uphill onto something resembling grits.

Keep mo(mentum) whenever you go, this is often needed in the performance of Olympic class off-road maneuvers or when exiting the beach onto a vehicular access point which is always up hill, soft and rutted. Watch for entering vehicles. Who has the right of way anyway? If you encounter traffic when entering or exiting the beach always give the vehicle on the beach the right of way.

Stopping:

When stopping, always plan ahead, only YOU should choose the time and place to stop, start and turn. Remember, the next thing you will want to do is GO. When you have chosen where and when to stop, don’t break, let your car coast to a stop, gravity and friction are your friend in stopping and usually don’t need any help. Where should you stop? If possible, stop on a down slope. Pick out a down slope with the firmest sand you can find. After you stop, kick out the sand that piles up especially ahead of the front tires.

You are probably catching tons of fish, but know thy tides and watch the time; the beach shrinks quickly on the rising tide from hard sand to soft. When parking you will want to try to do so off the main trail so that others can drive by you in the packed ruts. Just courtesy, that’s all, and if you would appreciate it, so will others.

 

When you get stuck, before you call the truck ($$$):

8 pull out_sYou will get stuck we all have, we all will, sometimes the beach just wins! There are some dos and don’ts for the stuck truck. Remember, dig out before you bottom out!! I know it’s cool to spin you wheels as you sink down in the sand until your under carriage is resting on the sand, but don’t. First of all, get out of the car, move sand away from the tires, and smooth out tire ruts, give yourself enough room to find forward mo(mentum, p=mv) again. If you can’t go forward, try backing out, sand is flatter where you were, than where you were trying to go. And oh, if you bypassed step number-two (see things to know before you go) now is the time to lower tire pressure. Often, that alone may get you going again.

How about other options? That board in the back of the car or truck, can be used for changing a tire, or under these conditions, for traction. Start slowly and make sure everyone stands aside and no one is in the line of fire. Pushing helps, but remember it’s bad form to run over the pusher or bury them in a cascade of sand. Of course if there are other 4x4ers on the beach, now might be the time to dig out that towrope, strap or chain. There is nothing fellow 4x4ers like to do, sometimes even more than catch fish, than to help out a fellow but stuck 4x4er.

After all the planning, after all the preparation and care, watching the tides and all, sometime “IT” happens! Such were the woes of an angler this fall, driving the beach, looking for a fall run of spotted sea trout somewhere along the North Carolina coast, but it could have been anywhere and could have been anyone. Parked in a slight depression of hard sand near the surf line at low tide, the fisherman, I’ll call this mythical beach worrier, Sonny, decided to move his truck to higher ground as the tide started to come in. First he couldn’t get out of the depression and in moments the sand did turn to something resembling grits and any movement sunk him deeper and closer to the now rapidly encroaching tide.

9 pulled out_sPlan “B”, when all else fails, now call the truck. Does your local garage do beach calls ($$$)? So Sonny enlisted the services of a local rescue service, but as fate would have it, their fate was now the same as Sonny’s, both stuck in grits, the ocean now above their hubcaps and the unrelenting tide still on the rise. Now in panic mode, plan “C” started to take shape, call in the heavy equipment before the two trucks were declared an artificial fishing reef. Can you say bulldozer? Well the ‘dozer did the trick, but not before both trucks and the reputation of the Sonny the angler were forever and irrevocably totaled. As I said, sometimes “IT” happens.

Finally, when driving the beach, think of safety and the safety of others first. Drive within local beach speed limits, driving responsibly means watching for beach-goers. You want to give a safe distance when passing people on the beach and be especially mindful of children playing as they are NOT going to be watching for traffic on the beach. Each municipality has their own regulations and remember access is a privilege not a right so respect their regulations, the local flora and fauna, regulations on restraining your pets and of course be mindful of bird and turtle nesting areas, and when leaving the beach make sure that you take all of your trash, and discarded fishing line with you. Well, good luck on the beach, and may your tires find only the firmest of sand.

Photos courtesy of Bil Gburek

 

 

Posted by & filed under Fishing, Reports category.

Dr. Bogus’ “Discouraging!” Fishing Report for 9/14/13. Surf 82°, sound 83°.

Every Monday Morning at 7:30 am on www.TheTalkStation.com. 107.1 FM (WTKF), 1240 AM (WJNC). If you can’t listen on the radio, you can log in to www.TheTalkStation.com and listen on-line or check out Coastal Daybreak on Facebook. The show will be linked there as an mp3 file. Now rebroadcast on each Sunday morning at 6:00am.

Now is the time to get a birthday or gift subscription for a fellow fisherman or spouse for fishing lessons (surf, pier or Bogue Sound) or the “Totally Bogus Fishing Report”. How about a Dr. Bogus hat? Gift Certificates are available. Don’t spend another year in the fish market, make this YOUR season to catch the big ones, just like me.

SPONSORs OF THE WEEK: These are VIP sponsors of Dr. Bogus and www.ncoif.com so please support them this season, Crystal Coast Adventures, Cape Custom Rods, Coastal Marine & Sports, Reel Outdoors Bait & Tackle and Village Market, Emerald Isle Realty, Cape Crusader Charters. Check the Sponsor’s section of www.ncoif.com for details and contact information, and please tell ‘em Dr. Bogus sent you!

“If you build it they will come,” a memorable line from the movie, Field of dreams. “If the bait comes the fish will follow,” is the typical cry concerning fishing and bait, but not always. This weekend, on the tails of a northeast wind we had, by my count mullet blow No. 2. Mullet came out into the surf again in great numbers but the response of the predatory fish has been a bit strange. By most reports, the surf action out of Beaufort Inlet from Ft. Macon to Oceanana Pier was excellent, blues, pups, flounder and Spanish responding the way they should…they came. On the Emerald Isle side of Bogue Banks, the response was at best muted, at worst nonexistent. We have seen a some blues and a ladyfish or two and still a few short flounder and very rarely a redfish, so the abundance of unmolested bait is somewhere between astonishing and annoying.

 What did I say to the shark that ate my Kastmaster? Any spots yet? What about Old Drum fishing in the Neuse, what artificials work? Flies? There has been a good summer speck bite, but where are they? Wahoo are still hot, but what’s the key water temp and where are they? Need an update on Bogue Banks or Topsail piers? I got it! How about a surf fishing update? The ony kings are where? Where did that 23-pound permit come from? Any kings on Bogue Banks or Topsail piers this week? For this and much more, you can subscribe to the full “Totally Bogus Fishing Report” for less than 7-cents/day, still only $25/year. It’s getting close to summer fishing season, so there’s no reason for YOU to miss out! Just send a check for $25 and your e-mail address to:

Dr. Bogus

P.O. Box 5225

Emerald Isle, NC 28594

The Ask Dr. Bogus Fishing show, heard every Monday morning at 7:30 on WTKF, 107.1 FM and 1240 AM can now be accessed on the Coastal Daybreak Facebook page. Sign up and be a friend at: https://www.facebook.com/coastal.daybreak and never miss a show. And now WTKF daily programming, including the Ask Dr. Bogus radio show is available in live streaming audio too. Just go to www.thetalkstation.com and click on the arrow. Just click to listen, it’s just that easy!

Bogus Notes: 1) Check me out at www.Facebook.com/Dr.Bogus. 2) Log onto my web site at www.ncoif.com. 3) “Ask Dr. Bogus” is on the radio every Monday 7:30 AM, WTKF 107.1 FM 1240 AM. Call in and Ask Dr. Bogus, 800.818.2255. 3) I’m located at 118 Conch Ct. in “Sea Dunes”, just off Coast Guard Rd., Emerald Isle, NC 28594. Mailing address is P.O. Box 5225, Emerald Isle, NC 28594. Don’t forget a gift certificate for your favorite angler for fishing lessons or my totally Bogus Fishing Report subscription. Please stop by at anytime and say “Hi” (252.354.4905).

Posted by & filed under Articles.

Dance of the mullets: jumpingmulletFish jump. Some jump for food, like the explosive sky shots of the king mackerel as he hits a bait and some like the tarpon for survival in their attempts to escape captivity when hooked. Mullet jump. Theories include predator escape, parasite removal, spawning behavior, aid to respiration and so on. My theory borders on the cultural and artistic; the dance of the mullets. On a morning early, with the idle chatter of mother nature unusually prominent, the creek was filled with the pirouettes of hundreds of mullets leaping. Their splashing return of silver droplets framed by the sun and with apt musical accompaniment of the high pitch of swallows on violin, kingfisher on piccolo, ducks and herons playing double reeds of the bassoon and oboe respectively and of course the woodpeckers-clearly percussion. Mulletcracker Suite, Mullet Lake or Dance of the Mullets!! Fish Jump.

Click on jumping mullet image to enlarge.

Photo compliments of David Sobotta of CrystalCoastLife.com

 

Posted by & filed under Fishing, Fishing News.

Division of Marine Fisheries receives sea turtle permit for gill net fisheries

MOREHEAD CITY (9/11/13) – The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries today signed an agreement with the National Marine Fisheries Service that implements a statewide incidental take permit for sea turtles in the estuarine large and small mesh gill net fisheries.

The permit authorizes the limited take of sea turtles in these fisheries and will allow the state to reopen some waters to gill net fishing that have been closed since July.

“This is the result of a lot of hard work by dedicated division staff,” said Louis Daniel, director of the Division of Marine Fisheries. “The flounder gill net fishery is an important economic factor in Eastern North Carolina, and this permit will allow it to continue on a limited basis while protecting threatened and endangered sea turtles.”

The division is considering when to reopen different waters based on the presence of sea turtles, because the number of allowed takes in some areas is low, Daniel said.

“A lot of these waters are going to close with one interaction,” Daniel said.

Also, the number of allowed takes for each area is for the entire period of Sept. 1 to Aug. 31 each year, so if an area must close, it closes the entire year.

The permit carries the same restrictions on soak times and gear requirements and requirement for observer coverage as was previously implemented through a lawsuit settlement agreement between the state and the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center.

In addition, the area previously known as the Pamlico Sound Gill Net Restricted Area now falls under the same soak times, gear requirements and observer requirements as other areas.

Daniel stressed the importance of fishermen complying with these regulations, including allowing observer coverage.

“If we do not meet the required percentage of observer coverage, the National Marine Fisheries Service can revoke this permit, which would close the fishery,” Daniel said.

Another new requirement is that all commercial and recreational fishermen must report any incidental capture of a sea turtle to the division at 252-726-7021 or 1-800-682-2632. This includes all gears.

“If you hook one as a recreational fisherman, you need to call it in,” Daniel said.

The permit and implementing agreement can be found on the division website at http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/ under Hot Topics.

For more information, contact the division’s Protected Resources Section Chief Chris Batsavage at 252-808-8009 or Chris.Batsavage@ncdenr.gov.

Posted by & filed under Fishing, Reports category.

Surf at Bogue Pier (blue) ranged from 76 to 84 and averaged 79.5 for the month. Bogue Sound (red) ranged from 74 to 87 and averaged 81.1 for the month.

 

      Date Surf Sound
8/1/2013 82 83
8/2/2013 82 83
8/3/2013 81 83
8/4/2013 77 85
8/5/2013 78 82
8/6/2013 79 82
8/7/2013 81 84
8/8/2013 83 85
8/9/2013 84 87
8/10/2013 82 85
8/11/2013 80 84
8/12/2013 79 86
8/13/2013 79 87
8/14/2013 79 83
8/15/2013 77 77
8/16/2013 76 75
8/17/2013 76 74
8/18/2013 79 82
8/19/2013 79 82
8/20/2013 79 82
8/21/2013 80 84
8/22/2013 82 85
8/23/2013 80 84
8/24/2013 78 81
8/25/2013 77 76
8/26/2013 78 76
8/27/2013 79 79
8/28/2013 79 78
8/29/2013 80 81
8/30/2013 78 79
8/31/2013 80 83